SHARE WEBSITE

Overwatering Is Out

Keep water in the yard, not the sidewalk.

Thanks for joining
the movement!

Your submission has been received.

Recommendations

Dog Owners: The One Action That Makes a Difference

In the movies, you’ve seen monsters lurking in storm drains, waterways and oceans. Well, in Orange County, we have a monster that is causing real havoc: dog poo!

It’s time to talk about a serious issue lurking in Orange County’s storm drains, waterways and oceans: dog poo!

Dog poo is a hodgepodge of bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can harm the health of our local waterways and the beauty of our beaches. That’s why as a responsible dog owner, it is crucial that you ALWAYS pick up after your pet.

If left on the ground, dog poo can travel into the storm drain when it rains or can be picked up by sprinkler runoff. As it decays in the water, it depletes oxygen levels and can release ammonia, which not only reduces the quality of our oceans, but hurts fish and other aquatic organisms.

Luckily for us, defeating this storm drain monster is easy! Putting pet waste in the trash using plastic bags is the preferred method for disposing of doggie waste.

Until you can teach your dog to pick up after himself or herself, be the responsible dog owner that Orange County needs and clean up after your dog.

VIDEO: Before & After with Kevin, OC Water Champion

          Gnorman the gnome spent one blissful February day lounging in Rancho Santa Margarita at Kevin Ells’ spectacular drought-tolerant home. He played with his dogs, frolicked in his succulent garden, and took in the sun alongside his daisies. Kevin and Gnorman also enjoyed a conversation about how he’s only been gardening for a little over a year, yet he has reaped so many benefits from embracing the drought-tolerant lifestyle.
          Watch the video below where Kevin shares his story and gives easy tips to save water and improve your gardening at home!

How can we help you reduce overwatering?

The title is not intended as rhetorical. Stopping overwatering is a great mixture of really simple (use an automatic shut off nozzle!) and really big (remove your turf grass) actions that, when done community wide, have a tremendous impact. Fortunately, there are a lot of medium actions in between like using a watering index or installing a rain barrel.

But even if it seems like there is something for everybody, maybe we haven’t hit that right tip for you. We’re eager to learn how we can better help all of the residents of Orange County stop overwatering and start finding sustainable solutions to beautify your outdoors while protecting the environment.

Share your thought in the comments below and we’ll pull together our team of experts to see how we can help you tackle your watering woes to make sure overwatering is out.

The Governor’s Mandatory Water Restrictions

By now we’ve all heard about the mandatory water restrictions that are going into place because of the drought. Those restrictions require local water districts to find strategies to reduce water use by up to 25%. That’s a big task.

Fortunately, Orange County is ahead of the curve when it comes to planning ahead and has put in place a world class water infrastructure. We’re better off today because we invested yesterday, and we’ll be better off tomorrow if we keep investing today!

Sooo, how do we do that? Well, we keep being water smart.

Curb Your Water Waste

The great news is that the same strategies that reduce how much water you use also help you stop overwatering. Use less water and you’re almost guaranteed to let less run off into the stormdrain system.

So, get out there and check those sprinklers for leaks, take advantage of spring to plant some California Friendly plants, and do your part to keep Orange County ahead of the curve when it comes to showing the state how to plan!

What are you going to do to help Orange County? Let me know in the comments below!

Or… Water Light when the Temps are Low

Last week we talked about just giving your turf grass and plants one good soak per week while the temperatures are low and the sun less intense. That is great advice, but it won’t work for all homes especially if you have clay soil or steep hills where a good soak means a lot of overwatering.

Fear not, there’s a solution for you too and that solution is (almost) just as easy.

The trick? Water in “spurts” (minimum 1 minute or up to 3 minutes max) a few times per week (as little as 1 to 3 times). This will give your turf grass and plants a lighter soak, but make sure your water isn’t escaping out into the streets.

Now, of course, the best news is that this water saving tip can get you Gnorman Approved. Head on over to the pledge page and you’ll have a yard sign faster than you can stop overwatering.

sign with ribbon
Let me know how it goes in the comments below!

Watering Less when Temps are Low

Even though we’re coming up on the end of the rainy season, the temperatures are still low and the sun less intense. That means that your plants and turf grass are still basking in the shade and don’t require nearly as much watering as they did during the hot summer months.

Here’s a couple of super easy and quick tips to dramatically reduce overwatering:

  • Let your turf grass get a little longer. The longer blades will hold more water, and help establish deeper roots. All you have to do is raise your lawn mower a notch and mow a bit less often.
  • Water just once per week and water a little longer than normal—check with your water provider for maximum run times and don’t water so long as to cause runoff! Turf grass only needs to be watered one day per week during these cooler months and a deeper soak will also encourage deeper root growth which will come in handy during the summer.

That’s right—two easy tips that ask you to spend less time working outdoors and more time enjoying it.

The best news is that if you do these two simple things or decide to try even more, you can jump on over to our pledge page and get your FREE Gnorman Approved yard sign! It can head your way without delay!

sign with ribbon

 

Let me know how it goes in the comments below!

Dirty Cars and Clean Water

There are always a lot of dusty cars this time of year as sporadic rains, morning dew and nightly fogs leave a layer on everything. That inevitably leads to a nice, sunny day when people get the idea to wash their cars. You might not realize it, but washing your car is potentially a huge source of overwatering. Fortunately, there are some easy actions you can take to reduce overwatering and stop polluting.

THE GOOD

The best thing you can do is use a commercial car wash. Commercial car washes follow regulations to minimize potential pollution. They also have the best equipment to recycle water or minimize excessive water waste. When in doubt—go to the pros.

THE BAD

If you wash your car at home, don’t wash it on the driveway. The water quickly streams down to the stormdrain system and takes with it all the dirt, grime, and potentially harmful soaps. Instead, wash your car on gravel, grass, or other permeable surfaces. This slows the flow of water and pollutants and lets the ground act as a natural filter.

THE UGLY

Whatever you do, make sure to use hoses with nozzles that automatically turn off when left unattended. There is no excuse to let a hose spray freely when it is not being used. Using a nozzle saves up to 10 gallons per minute. That means that if it takes you just 20 minutes to wash your car, you’d be overwatering up to 200 gallons if you don’t use the right equipment!

Just like that, three easy actions you can take to stop overwatering.

  • If you’re going to wash your car, take it to the pros
  • If you’re washing it at home, wash it over a permeable surface so the water doesn’t go to waste or to the ocean
  • And whatever you do, make sure your hoses have an automatic shut off nozzle!

Where do you wash your car?

Get Fit By Hand

We’re still in the rainy season which means cooler days and less sun (in addition to the occasional rain shower). That means your plants and turf grass also require less water! If you’re looking for a fun and easy way to add a little exercise to your life, try turning off your automated sprinklers and watering by hand.
READ MORE »

Study Up For Spring

If you’re like me, you’re already getting that Spring itch and thinking about your garden. We’ve already covered a few easy steps you can take to start going California Friendly, but what if you want more? A lot more? READ MORE »

Going Friendly in 6 Steps

We’re still in the winter season, but it is never too early to start planning for how you’re going to stop overwatering all next summer! One of the best ways to do that is by reducing how much water your garden needs by planting California Friendly plants. The best time to do *that* is in the fall and winter when the temperatures are cooler and rain is more likely. READ MORE »

« Older Entries