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Overwatering Is Out

Keep water in the yard, not the sidewalk.

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drought tolerant

A Field of Wildflowers. . . At Your Front Door!

With news of the recent super bloom happening across California, why not bring home a bit of wildflower color to your own home? Wildflowers can grow in the most unlikely places: along freeways, in the cracks of sidewalks, and in your own yard! All you need are some wildflower mix, a sunny day and the 4 steps below to get started:

  1. Find an area where the seeds will get to the ground easily. Scattering seeds atop mulch will not work. Gnorman recommends placing seeds along sandy patches or the space between other plants.
  2. Rake the wildflower seeds in lightly. This is more to confuse the birds than to bury the seed. Wildflowers prefer to be scattered about and not buried; it’s how the seed was designed.
  3. If it doesn’t rain, water weekly until the wildflowers begin to rise and form buds. If it rains that week, do not worry about watering.
  4. At the end of the season, feel free to mow the plants after they have produced and released seeds. This will allow the seeds to stay dormant in your yard over the summer and winter, and then return again next spring!

To keep up with the Overwatering is Out movement and prevent runoff, please only use natives for wildflowers since they can spread easily! If you accidentally use something invasive, it will be incredibly difficult to get rid of. Please read the full list of what is in the bag of seed mix to ensure there are no filler species. Ask your local nursery if you are unsure or send an email to gnome@h20c.org.

Here is a starter list of California Friendly species to look for in seed mixes.

  • Eschscholzia californica California Poppy
  • Lotus scoparius Deer Weed
  • Lupinus bicolor Miniature Lupine
  • Lupinus hirsutissimus Nettle Lupine
  • Lupinus nanus Sky Nettle
  • Nemophila menziesii Baby Blue Eyes
  • Nemophila maculata Five Spot
  • Oenothera elata Yellow Evening Primrose
  • Eriophyllum confertiflorum Golden Yarrow
  • Collinsia heterophylla Chinese Houses
  • Sisyrinchium bellum Blue-eyed Grass
  • Baileya multiradiata Desert Marigold
  • Linum lewisii Blue Flax
  • Penstemon centranthifolius Scarlet Bugler
  • Mimulus puniceus Bush Monkeyflower
  • Sphaeralcea ambigua Apricot Mallow

Easy Herbs for Your Holiday Meal

With the upcoming holidays, why not sprinkle extra love into your holiday cooking by using herbs hand-picked from your own garden? An herb garden strengthens a beginner’s green thumb and adds flavorful variety to the expert’s garden. The selected herbs below do not need fertilizer, require little water, and are disease and pest resistant.

  • Rosemary:  Grow rosemary in a container such as a terracotta pot to bring indoors during winter
  • Sage: A Thanksgiving Staple, sage grows best in hot, dry climates such as Orange County
  • Thyme: This low-maintenance herb will grow best in poor soil with little water.

As a bonus, the herbs add delicious flavor to your holiday meals. Try growing some today!

In 2016, the award for most beautiful garden goes to…

Congratulations to the 2016 winners of our “Drought, Camera, Action!” photo contest!

The wait is over gneighbors! Here are Orange County’s most beautiful drought tolerant photos:

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